An analysis of the four major themes in the novel of mice and men by john steinbeck

Both men carry blanket rolls — called bindles — on their shoulders. The smaller, wiry man is George Milton.

An analysis of the four major themes in the novel of mice and men by john steinbeck

His friend Ed Ricketts shaped Steinbeck's thinking about man's place in the universe. Essentially, man is a very small part of a very large universe; in the greater scheme of things, individuals come and go and leave very little, lasting mark.

Yet deep inside all people is a longing for a place in nature — the desire for the land, roots, and a place to call "home. In sharing his vision of what it means to be human, Steinbeck touches on several themes: Nature of Dreams In essence, Of Mice and Men is as much a story about the nature of human dreams and aspirations and the forces that work against them as it is the story of two men.

Humans give meaning to their lives — and to their futures — by creating dreams. Without dreams and goals, life is an endless stream of days that have little connection or meaning. George and Lennie 's dream — to own a little farm of their own — is so central to Of Mice and Men that it appears in some form in five of the six chapters.

In fact, the telling of the story, which George has done so often, becomes a ritual between the two men: George provides the narrative, and Lennie, who has difficulty remembering even simple instructions, picks up the refrain by finishing George's sentences.

To George, this dream of having their own place means independence, security, being their own boss, and, most importantly, being "somebody. It means security, the responsibility of tending to the rabbits, and a sanctuary where he won't have to be afraid.

For Crooksthe little farm will be a place where he can have self-respect, acceptance, and security. For each man — George, Lennie, Candy, and Crooks — human dignity is an integral part of the dream.

Having and sharing the dream, however, are not enough to bring it to fruition. Each man must make a sacrifice or battle some other force that seeks, intentionally or not, to steal the dream away.

Initially, the obstacles are difficult but not insurmountable: But greater obstacles soon become apparent. For George, the greatest threat to the dream is Lennie himself; ironically, it is Lennie who also makes the dream worthwhile.

Loneliness In addition to dreams, humans crave contact with others to give life meaning. Loneliness is present throughout this novel. On the most obvious level, we see this isolation when the ranch hands go into town on Saturday night to ease their loneliness with alcohol and women.

An analysis of the four major themes in the novel of mice and men by john steinbeck

Similarly, Lennie goes into Crook's room to find someone with whom to talk, and later Curley's wife comes for the same reason. Crooks says, "A guy goes nuts if he ain't got nobody.

Don't make no difference who the guy is, long's he's with you. That ain't no good. They don't have no fun. After a long time they get mean. Similarly, Lennie's desire to pet soft things comes from his need to feel safe and secure, to touch something that gives him that feeling of not being alone in the world.

For Lennie, the dream of the farm parallels that security. Continued on next pageMain Ideas. Here's where you'll find analysis about the book as a whole, from the major themes and ideas to analysis of style, tone, point of view, and more.

Theme Statements for Of Mice and Men Friendship: In Of Mice and Men, Steinbeck shows that friendship is important in preventing loneliness by providing a purpose in life and a sense of companionship. LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in Of Mice and Men, which you can use to track the themes throughout the work.

Broken Plans Of Mice and Men takes its title from a famous lyric by the Scottish poet Robert Burns ( - ). In my essay I"m going to discuss the four major themes in the novel, "Of Mice and Men" (by John Steinbeck).

The themes are: loneliness, dreams, friendship discrimination or inequality. Loneliness affects many of the characters in the novel, and Steinbeck seems to show that it's a natural and. Much like Steinbeck's short novel The Pearl, Of Mice and Men is a parable that tries to explain what it means to be human.

His friend Ed Ricketts shaped Steinbeck's thinking about man's place in the universe. - Analysis of Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck Of Mice And Men' by John Steinbeck is a classic novel, tragedy, written in a social tone.

The authorial attitude is idyllic, however, as the story develops it .

Of Mice and Men: THEMES - THEME ANALYSIS / IRONY by John Steinbeck